Proposal Information

Thank you for your interest in the 2012 Forum Call for Proposals. The proposal submission deadline was October 31, 2011. Notifications will be sent to those who completed a proposal no later than January 17, 2012.

Concurrent sessions will occur Monday, June 4, 2012 through Wednesday, June 6, 2012. Proposals can be submitted for the following formats:

  • Category Descriptions

    IR in Practice sessions share innovative applications, creative and effective practices, and professional work products in institutional research, assessment, planning, and other data-centered functions. The role of the presenter(s) is to convey information about the session topic. Presentation slides and handouts are frequently used. At least 10 minutes should be reserved for questions and audience participation. Sessions may be led by one or more presenters.

    The following information is required for an IR in Practice proposal:

    • Title (limit 30 words)
    • Program Book Abstract (limit 100 words): Identify the issue to be addressed and the importance to IR professionals. Inform potential participants about what they will gain by attending.
    • Proposal Narrative (limit 500 words): Explain why this topic is important to IR professionals. Identify any new, unique, or improved practices that will be shared in your presentation. State a minimum of two (2) learning outcomes for participants.
    • Presenter(s) Experience (limit 150 words): Describe each presenter’s experience and perspective relative to this topic.
  • Category Descriptions

    These highly interactive discussions focus on a current topic or issue in the field. The session leader presents brief opening remarks to define the topic and set the context for the session. A set of questions submitted with the session proposal provides the structure for the discussion that follows. The leader’s role also includes encouraging participants to share their perspectives and providing a summary and closure to the discussion. Discussions may be led by an individual or two co-leaders.

    The following information is required for a Discussion Group proposal:

    • Topic (limit 5 words): This should be limited to keyword identifiers. (Examples: Retention, Enrollment Management, Data Warehousing).
    • Program Book Description (limit 100 words): Provide a brief description of the main discussion topic. List three to five (3-5) questions that will serve as the organizing structure for the discussion group.

      Please use this basic formula for your descriptor sentence: This discussion will address (topic stated in generic terms) within the (fill in parameters/context of).
    • Proposal Narrative (limit 500 words): Explain why this topic is important to IR professionals. Describe what you hope discussants will gain from participating.
    • Presenter(s) Experience (limit 150 words): Describe each presenter’s experience and perspective relative to this topic.
  • Category Descriptions

    Panel Sessions include multiple perspectives about an IR application, practice, or topic of interest. Panels are typically composed of three to five presenters with one member serving as the moderator. Panelists usually represent multiple organizations/sectors, and always have identifiable multi-perspective points of view. Proposals must identify both the learning outcomes to be achieved and the presentation structure that will be used to manage the multi-perspective panel format.

    The following information is required for a Panel Session proposal:

    • Title (limit 30 words)
    • Program Book Abstract (limit 100 words): Identify the issue, problem, or question to be addressed and the importance to IR professionals. Briefly describe the various perspectives to be discussed and what participants will gain by attending.
    • Proposal Narrative (limit 500 words): Explain why this topic is important to IR professionals. Share the outline for your session including the various perspectives each presenter will represent. State a minimum of two (2) learning outcomes for participants.
    • Presenter(s) Experience (limit 250 words): Describe each presenter’s experience and perspective relative to this topic.
  • Category Descriptions

    A Poster Presentation is a visual display that communicates the purpose, research approach, data sources, and outcomes of a research project. Posters will be displayed on a 4' X 4' corkboard in the Exhibit Hall and presenters will be available for a scheduled 60-minute question and answer period. Handouts that summarize the research should be uploaded to the AIR website at least one week prior to the Forum.

    The following information is required for a Poster Presentation proposal:

    • Title (limit 30 words)
    • Program Book Abstract (limit 100 words): Identify the issue to be addressed by this research and the importance to IR professionals. Briefly describe the research approach and identify data sources used. Inform potential participants about key findings and what they will gain by attending.
    • Proposal Narrative (limit 500 words): Explain why this topic is important to IR professionals. State the research question(s), details of key findings, and proposed participant learning outcomes. Share how you will effectively communicate this information through a visual display.
    • Presenter(s) Experience (limit 150 words): Describe each presenter’s experience and perspective relative to this topic.
  • Category Descriptions

    Scholarly Paper Presentations share a research study, methodology, or theoretical construct and are accompanied by a written paper that includes research questions, description of methodology, and outcomes. At the time the proposal is submitted, the importance of the issue, research question, methodology, and data sources to be used must be known. Findings and conclusions may not be known at the time the proposal is submitted, but the paper must be finalized and uploaded to the AIR website by March 30, 2012 to qualify for inclusion as a Scholarly Paper Presentation.

    The following information is required for a Scholarly Paper Presentation proposal:

    • Title (limit 30 words)
    • Program Book Abstract (limit 100 words): Identify the issue to be addressed by this research and the importance to IR professionals. Briefly describe the research approach and identify data sources used. Inform potential participants about key findings and what they will gain by attending.
    • Proposal Narrative (limit 500 words): Explain why this topic is important to IR professionals. State the research question(s), details of key findings, and proposed participant learning outcomes.
    • Presenter(s) Experience (limit 150 words): Describe each presenter’s experience and perspective relative to this topic.

Tracks

Sessions are organized by Track to help attendees identify presentations in common topic areas. It is not unusual for a proposal to overlap more than one track; select the one that best reflects the main theme of your proposal.

  • Category Descriptions
    The Technology Track focuses on the technology used to achieve outcomes, with the outcomes themselves a secondary focus. Topics in this track include data management issues such as data storage and data dictionaries, data warehousing, data marts, and the technology involved in developing dashboard or scorecard sites and on-line fact books, and demonstrations of new technologies.
  • Category Descriptions
    The Analysis Track focuses on research methods, experimental design, survey techniques and response rates, and analytic methods (both qualitative and quantitative) that produce sound analyses for decision making. The use of national datasets or consortia data is included as well. The emphasis of this track is on the tool, methods, or sources used to arrive at a result, with the result itself of secondary importance.
  • Category Descriptions
    The Assessment Track encompasses the development and measurement of student learning outcomes, general education and academic program assessment studies, assessments of co-curricular offerings, analyses undertaken for accreditation review, strategic planning assessment, and the ties between assessment results and measuring institutional effectiveness.
  • Category Descriptions
    The Resources Track focuses on faculty workload studies, salary equity for faculty and staff, staffing issues, strategic planning and budgeting, campus master plan development, economic impact studies, funding sources, faculty promotion and tenure studies, and analysis of benchmarking data related to faculty, finances, or facilities..
  • Category Descriptions
    The Students Track includes studies of enrollment management, retention/graduation, student engagement, transfer, student and alumni satisfaction, demand for majors and programs, and co-curricular activities. Studies focusing on student financial aid practices and findings are included as well.
  • Category Descriptions
    The Collaboration Track focuses on strategic planning efforts, environmental scanning, providing reports and data to external entities such as federal and state/provincial governments, fact book and web portal content and delivery, and the mission and staffing of IR offices. Ethical considerations for institutional research are part of this track.